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has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king in a more just society. but i must tell you what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits are out of the hallways and the public walls of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. .. he has been riding the horse since the day he got here, and thanks to karlin's leadership. thanks to marvin pinkert, he calls the genius behind the development of the new space. all of us as citizens can far better experience our history, and as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen, i value this place deeply. it's very, very important. your participation is urged because it's a good thing and for an additional reason, that my vocal chords may fail sometimes but i'm going to go for it, and let's hope i can keep on talking. the two days -- no. i want to add one more thing about the archives. john said it, and it's true. people like me, who want to research american history, are incredibly dependent on the resources of the national archives. i, and my research assistants, including josh is
johnson if he heard bobby kennedy something critical of president johnson through king. in other words, this was hoover's job was basically to ingratiate himself with johnson to punish bobby kennedy, whom she didn't like and to punish king whenever he could. c-span: by the way, did you listen to the johnson takes? >> guest: yes. that's a whole -- c-span: so you could hear all of those? >> guest: you can hear those. the john thune defeat could johnson tapes were wonderful. they corroborate a lot of what's in a declassified meetings on vietnam and in some of the files, but there's no substitute for actually hearing the tapes. and i quote from a number of them here. c-span: what is the trilogy? >> guest: the trilogy? c-span: money, loyalty, sex. >> guest: money, loyalty -- that became the short hand once bobby -- once dr. king became aware as i said, juneau, a lot of times they thought the thing store being done to them, a hostile things that were being done to them by the police were being done by segregation molest police force, but once they became aware that is the fbi, they had these
johnson readily be barry goldwater and richard nixon overwhelming george mcgovern. in each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public. and the winner had the advantage of the weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term, landslide, because of his huge popularity. however, in many more presidential elections, the candidates are in a heated battle to present themselves as the one best capable of serving the country with the winner walking off with the modest majority. it is a customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president, or a judgment of which candidate will be the better leader. is there really a difference between these two considerations? does not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on his effectiveness during his first term, versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger? it's easy to point to the national security, or the economic consequences, or consequent impact on the ratin
.her half - sister's high school sweetheert... and ex- &pboyfriend.... michael johnson... is charged with her murddr.we are told barness' courtroom... in town from atlanta.johnson's attornee says he maintains hhs innocence and an alibi for him... here he is the day &pafter johnson's arrest. &pruuselllneverdon, attorney: "i've spoken with my client when hh said he reported there when he was fiist called. hee contact with herr and he was - dealing with his new friend, i mean, that's where he was.. the defense is expected to who claims he saw barnes affer she as reporred missing.juuy &pseleetion begins tomorrow.pau today'ssinaauuration was &pdifferent from president pbama's first..... .. in mmny crowds.many would argue the r c- tone of the speech, reflects a nation even more dividdd thaa it was four yeers ago. 3 inaugural address..... of - president barack obama.we sat down to watch it ..... with two maryland lawmakkrs on both sidee of the aisle......nd a professor of rhetoric at i thought this was tte anti :00- kennedy inaugurual.(butt to):16 this inuaugural was all about you.(sot
at that time. the samuel johnson had not picked them up. he saw the language of of the street as part of what was part of language. so this -- there was this sort of democratic background of this thing. and as it goes along, there are things that, for example, jefferson creates which are hysterical. i mean, he comes up with twistification which sounds like something that george bush would come up with. [laughter] but there's some just wonderful things. and, of course b, his -- preble on the seedier side -- probably on the seedier side, and i'm relying on the oxford english dictionary to tell you this, but the cop la story verb to shag is credited to thomas jefferson in one of his diaries. and it does not appear in the any slang dictionary for another 30 years. and this, again, i'm using the be all and end all for sort of early nailing down when a word was created, so austin powers did not create the word "shag," it was thomas jefferson. [laughter] you can tell, by the way, that i have a lot of fun doing this. the other challenge was just looking at how this progressed. you can look at differe
on tonight is at the historic theater. >> bruce johnson is live at the historic landmark. >> reporter: hey guys, first off congratulations to the ravens. a lot of fans inside there and a lot of people glued to their smart phones watching the game as they were partying for barack obama and paying tribute to the late dr. martin luther king. a lot of people inside old enough to remember martin luther king and the 1963 march year of the washington. you want to start an interesting conversation. ask this well-educated well- connected crowd. what was more important, the first time barack obama was elected. first african american president or the fact that he was just real. let's go inside. i want to tell you some of what they had to say. >> reporter: the historic theater was jumping on stage with the kind of jazz they want to improve. >> i want them to leave the president alone. >> reporter: but outside the upscale gathering waited. >> they have a little more power. >> they have supported president barack obama a second time. and their money, their campaign, and their votes. >> mitch mcconnell s
johnson is live in the nation's capital with more on the inauguration. good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you. that's right. we are live here on the national mall in the nation's capital hours before the president takes the oath of office for second time. officially he was sworn in yesterday before noon because the contusion requires it and i have to tell you a number of people are starting to pack the nation's capital here. the mall is practically filled with people. they are starting to pour in. so it's a big day a lot of activity going to be going on. it's day filled with a lot of activity from the ceremonial oath of office to the inaugural parade and the inaugural ball. this morning, there's already a lot of activity with a setup for the activities and also security checks. many of the streets blocked off in and it is participation of the huge crowds not as many as the first inauguration four years ago but still a large crowd with hundreds of thousands of people. they are expecting about 800,000 people. the vips will arrive around 9 this morning with former presidents and g
distribution system that we can tap into. johnson: in the mid-1990s, the water system had just about collapsed. the district had just run into some very dire financial circumstances, and, when those kinds of things happen, the very first thing that goes is maintenance of those things that one does not see. egan: you have hydrants that were manufactured in the 1800s. you have underground pipes, you have underground valves. they get what they call tuberculin built up. you would compare it to a 100-year-old man that has heavy cholesterol. they could be 6- or 8-inch mains, but being 100 years old, they actually may be 2-inch mains. and they reduce the amount of volume of water that's available to us. johnson: there were a number of things that we have had to do in order to get the system back up to an acceptable standard. replacing mains and valves and fire hydrants and other components of the system to ensure that it operates properly. egan: we consider both the underground infrastructure and the above ground assets to be a part of the critical infrastructure of the city. johnson: and if the infr
brother showing up. >> exactly. >> who are these half brothers. with billy carter you had. johnson had samuel johnson, the estranged brothers. we're lucky he doesn't have any strange family aspect. >> well, he does. >> not in this country. >> in kenya. >> a new rule for families. thank you, eugene robinson, for that joy. joy reid, michael steele. howard fineman and i'll be right back with another hour live edition of "hardball." "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, krischris, and thank you for tuning in. we're covering this amazing, historic day in washington. the inauguration of barack obama as our president. right now, the president and the vice president are watching the inaugural parade with groups from all over the country going by and standing in front of the white house. just moments ago, the airmen passed by and got a standing ovation. earlier today, the president gave his second inaugural address, a stirring, passionate call for equality and fairness. forging a more perfect union and helping the country live up to the meaning of its creed. >> we, the
and rebuild these assets is an ongoing struggle. johnson: there is a gap between what's being spent by municipalities and water supply systems and what needs to be spent. and somehow that has to be made up. so there's a good bit of lobbying through congress to get funding. oberstar: we need to restore the construction grant program. we need to invest substantially more, on the federal government side, as an inducement to states and local governments to make the investments they need to make. man: but the federal role is going to continue to be diminished because of so many competing demands. so the expectation that the federal government will step in and infuse a lot of capital into water infrastructure, i think, is doubtful. and whether they should or not, i think, will continue to be debated. narrator: where money continues to be elusive, some cities and towns are turning their assets over to private companies, hoping the private sector can find the solutions they cannot. man: in the u.s., roughly 90% of all water and wastewater systems are still publicly owned and publicly manage
. washington is abuzz before the big inaugural ceremony and sherrie johnson is out at the mall in washington, d.c. with more. good morning. >> we apologize we are having an audio issue with sherrie johnson. we will try work that out but this is video of the president. this is from four years ago, the first time was sworn in as you can see. you saw george w. bush in the crowd and he won't be there this year nor is his father because he is recovering from bronchitis. celebrations start with the parade and the balls and you know the pomp and circumstances today. the official business was yesterday and then they will celebrate today. >> 800,000 people expected to be there today. and also if you want to head to the inauguration but don't want to deal with the hassles of driving you could have another option. today, there's going to be a special marc train service to dc. mta official will be on penn and brunswick line selling tickets costing about $25 for a round trip ticket and they only acceptcash. trains will not run all day so double check the schedule beforeheading out the door. >>> when preside
are expected from johnson & johnson, mcdonald's, verizon, procter & gamble. also coming out in tech, apple, ibm, google and microsoft. tuesday, last month sales of existing homes will be out. on friday we get new home sales reports for the month of december. also, by the way, friday is treasury secretary timothy geithner's last day on the job. jack lew takes over from there. finally, fortune magazine releasing the annual list of 100 best companies to work for. search giant google is tops for the fourth year in a row thanks to the 100,000 hours of free massage, employee wellness centers and seven-acre sports complex. pretty good. rounding out the top five are fas, data an his ticks firm, chg health care, and wegman's food market in new york. they're looking to fill more than 65,000 jobs this year. >>> that will do it for us today. thank you so much for joining me. next week i will be reporting from word economic forum in davos, switzerland. we will take you there. each week keep it right here where we are "on the money." have a great weekend. [ crickets chirping ] [ traffic passing ] ♪ [ music
of earnings season for the fourth quarter. reports are expected from johnson & johnson, mcdonald's, verizon, proctor & gamble. also coming out in tech, apple, ibm, google, and microsoft. tuesday, exisales of existing hs will be out. also by the way, friday is treasury secretary timothy geithner's last day on the job. jack lew takes over from there. >>> finally, "fortune" magazine releasing its annual list of the companies to look for. google was tops thanks to the 100,000 hours of free massage and a seven-acre sports complex. pretty good. rounding out the top five are sas, a data analytics firm, chg health care in salt lake city, the boston consulting group and wegmans food market. 78 of those best companies are looking to fill more than 65,000 jobs this year. that'll do it for us for today. thank you so much for joining me. next week, i'll be reporting from the world economic forum in switzerland where business and political leaders will be gathering to talk global issues. we'll take you there. each week keep it here where we are "on the money." have a great week, everybody. see you again
in the nation's capital with estimates ranging as high as 1.9 million people. until then, lyndon johnson held the record crowd of 1.2 million in 1965. attendance for president obama's second inauguration is projected to be lower than his first. president george w. bush's second inaugural in 2005 drew up to 500,000 people.>> it may be sot before we get the official estimate of the crowd here, certainly not 1.8 million who were here in 2009, but estimates before the inauguration ranged from 600,000 to 800,000 but what we can report to you is that there were a lot of americans in the national mall today who were overjoyed to witness history, inauguration of any president is a remarkable moment in american history. and they were there today, many of them with their children to see these events. the president was inaugurated of course under the -- in the shadow i probably should say, the capitol dome. a fascinating thing about the dome of the capitol, this year is the 150th anniversary of the completion of the capitol dome. something that was mentioned today during the president's inauguration. h
-- johnson says to bush what are you doing here? bush he said, we just want to pay our respects. johnson was advising bush for the next couple of years about whether or not to run for office. johnson's the one who when bush was going to run for the senate he said what's the difference between the house and the senate? he said what's the difference between chicken and chicken salad? can you imagine now a republican congressman from houston going to see off a democratic president out of respect? >> especially mika the inauguration of a newly elected president in your party when everybody is most excited to elbow their way to the front. for george h.w. bush that's a great example. another great example, william f. buckley. he had liberal friends. in fact, he campaigned for liberals that were his friends even though he knew it upset some on the conservative side. for william f. buckley, it wasn't a blood sport. >> to end this block, to counter it just a bit, and i'm sorry but it has the added value of being true, the president does need to reach out.agree. but he has, an
that made it. >> i would like you to meet michael johnson. he has been in the program for over 8 years. >> nice to me you. what inspired your photography? >> i am inspired everything that i see. the greatest thing about being a photographer is being able to show other people what i see. i have mostly worked in cuba and work that i shot here in san francisco. >> what is it about being a street artist that you particularly like? >> i liked it to the first day that i did it. i like talking to mentum people. talking about art or anything that comes to our minds. there is more visibility than i would see in any store front. this would cost us relatively very little. >> i am so happy to meet you. i wish you all of the best. >> you are the wonderful artist that makes these color coding. >> nice to me to. >> i have been a street artist since 1976. >> how did you decide to be a street artist? >> i was working on union square. on lunch hours, i would be there visiting the artist. it was interesting, exciting, and i have a creative streak in me. it ranges from t-shirts, jackets, hats. what is the
to the end of it. >> you can make argument against term limits. but lyndon johnson understood, he had a few months. just a few months. that's when he got voting rights done. that's when he got a lot of those major pieces of great society legislation done, was in those months of 1965. medicare, all that. and so, i think we're likely to see a lot of activity right now. >> on immigration, guns, debt. all coming up. we're going to get that all day long here. >>> i want to go back to josh elliott on pennsylvania avenue. you're giving us a little weather, right, josh? >> it's a beautiful day. you were speaking of the battle lines drawn. let today stand as it is, an oasis of unity. one that is brisk but sunny. we want to thank our sam champion dearly for the weather we have in the nation's capital today, sam. >> just because it could have been worse. we've had everything. it's the topic all politicians and news folks will agree on today. washington's weather regularly changes in january. ronald reagan had the warmest and the coldest inauguration day. 55 degrees, and the coldest ever, 7 degrees in
director anne hinton. >> good afternoon, council members. and director johnson. i am actually shareen micspanneden, the assistant executive director of department of aging and adult services. i apologize on believe of anne hinton who really wanted to be here, but was ill all week and wanted to be here with you today. i will do my best to channel her and do as close to a good job as she would have been if she were here. you are familiar with the fact that california is moving to a managed care model for health care deliveriy and in san francisco, that means that health care for people on medical, and for people on medical and medicare will be managed care. in san francisco there are two plans that are responsible for providing that health care delivery. one is san francisco health plan and one is anthem bluecross. san francisco health plan is the non-profit provider and anthem bluecross is the for-profit provider. in san francisco we have the two-plan model. for those people who are seniors and people with disabilities on medical only, those people have already moved into managed care
johnson, the interim director of the mayor's office on disability. the first announcement that i would like to make is that as we were listening to the reading of the agenda a little earlier and the discussion about the accessible meeting information here at city hall, i just wanted to provide a quick update for people who are using mobility devices to let you know that right now the lift at the carlton goodlett street entrance formerly known as the polk street entrance is not operational and we're ordering a replacement for it soon. so if you are coming to city hall, please come by any the other three accessible entrances which would be the van ness side of the building, the mcallister or grove side of the building. we do apologize for the inconvenience this may have caused. it feels like a really long time i have seen all of you. it's been a month since we met at city hall -- actually it's been a month since i have seen you and two months since we have have our last mdc meeting. i have a quite a bit of information. the first thing i wanted to brief you on is our office move. our
: how many inaugurations have been been to? >> 13 lyndon johnson 1964 was my first. i came with my mom. this is before i worked at cbs and then my first one as a reporter was 1968 with richard nixon. >> jon: oh, that was an exciting one. >> yeah. >> jon: that was all the counter culture. >> i was actually sent down abby hoffman. >> jon: sure. >> they decided they would inaugurate a pig while he was inaugurated. they d. that was my assignment. i went down there. [ laughter ] >> jon: wait -- >> it was raining. >> jon: i just want everybody to catch up to this for a second. >> yes. >> jon: so you went there as a all righter and they said, bob, we have an assignment for you. >> first assignment in washington. >> jon: there's this pig -- [ laughter ] -- and then -- >> the pig got out. they got the pig out and it was raining and we chased the pig around. [ laughter ] and i called my mother that night and she said it must have been so wonderful. tell me about the dresses the ladies we are at the inaugural. i said mom, i'm out here chasing a pig in the rain. i didn't get indoors. you have to s
overlooked is large cap pharma. and we like names like johnson & johnson, merck and in particular pfizer. cheryl: those are the three names. you also like some drug distribution companies. one name? >> yeah, cardinal health. if you look at what happened over the last several years, we had a big pick-up in the generic pipeline, 2013, there's a big drop-off, but coming in 2014, 2015, is another big generic wave, particularly for the so-called limited source drugs, which are limited to a couple distributors, and that should be good for companies like cardinal health. cheryl: all right. well certainly again earnings season is picking up. i'm curious in this healthcare space particularly if we're going to get upside surprises when it comes to earnings and dividends. >> we think you will see upside surprises particularly in healthcare after the recent jpmorgan healthcare conference, we saw a lot of strength in healthcare names. we think that's going to continue throughout earnings season. we think there are companies across the equity space that will outperform, but in general, we really like
. and they learned that. and then when kennedy was assassinated and johnson was uprose civil-rights because of that the civil rights act of '64 and '65, actually enacted into law. >> of a point did you become aware in your life of the civil rights commission? >> i became aware of them when i was in the graduate program university. asked if i work on a project. >> sixty's, 70's. >> yes. i used some of the reports because the reports they did were very good reports. some of the historical research that i did. so i was very much aware of them. finally by the time the commission as to me since i've do legal and constitutional history file would read something of a history of abortion rights for them and how that all played out and what the history had been all the way back to england and so on. i did a report for them. >> what is your history? >> i'm from tennessee. nash fell. my family and their relatives are all still there. i went to a pro high-school. i went to howard university. then i went to the university of michigan. first the history department where i got a ph.d. then i went to law s
johnson, was in power. this president has made no secret of his ambition to be the fourth transformative president. and the question is, will he, in his speech today, show a kind of combative nature that led to franklin roosevelt's overreaching and historic change of the politics of the country? >> you see the congressional leaders for the country. steny hoyer, and we just saw them go to the capitol. >> we saw janet napolitano, and security making their way in. you were talking about lincoln in the course of this presidency. i want to pick up the pictures of him because they are among the most startling. he lost 50 pounds. he was about 150 pounds weighing in, at 6'4". >> the picture on the right side, abraham lincoln, only 56 years old. look at those eyes. of course, the lincoln memorial there. martin luther king in the shadow, gave that speech 50 years ago. and there, we see, as you see more -- i think that's katy perry there. >> i believe it is. >> on the steps of the capitol. along with john mayer. we're going to come back. she performed at the kids' concert saturday night. we're goin
. and finally, when he supports social security, medicaid and medicare, that's straight lyndon johnson, great society talk. this is a speech in the progressive tradition. at some points it's like the second inaugural of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that'
was rare. very, very rare. so in lyndon johnson's tenure as majority leader which ended when he was vice president in january of '61, there was one filibuster in his six years. and harry reid's six years, almost 400. that's the contrast. it's gradual. the right to filibuster has been there since the modern senate was there. but it's the perversion of senators that are willing to filibuster anything, any single thing they bring this to bear. >> describe that perversion. >> that perversion is everything from the almost 100 judicial vacancies that you talked about to many examples of recess appointments in the executive branch. we just spent $3 billion on a presidential election and the president's appointees, most of them he makes now are most likely never to get confirmed, unlikely to get debated, certainly unlikely to get discussed and certainly unlikely to serve. >> you want to end the filibuster. what's behind that? >> senator jeff morgan would make it essential that people talk. this is what the american people want. it would encourage debate, it wouldn't push it away. >> what is your
and congress was contingent on not taking a stand with vietnam. >> host: president johnson was very upset with dr. king he felt that we have handed civil rights and voting rights over now you go against me that imf for reelection on the vietnam war? >> guest: now eyes understood what courage it took to take a stand that he did and why he hesitated. coretta did not. she was very involved earlier but she was not the public figure. he could send her to speak with him. >> host: and then proved him right. >> guest: this is the way that he is a visionary. with the anti-colonial movement around the world and have a cold war prevented us to show us we were on the wrong side because because the communist movement had identified itself with anti-colonialism many wanted to have the system of the soviet union they were for it but we were opposed. >> host: you left the country during the vietnam era. why? >> guest: for me looking back it was not that difficult of a choice. i knew i would not go into military. >> host: weren't you drafted? >> guest: several times. i tried to be a conscientious objector
nixon and remember what happened to him. iran-contra for president reagan. >> and lyndon johnson and vietnam war. >> right. >> one of the things we know absolutely for sure is that something is going to go wrong in the second term. >> it always happens. >> always. sometimes you can foresee it, natural disaster, a terrorist attack. it could be who know what is? i think that we're pretty safe in deciding that there's not a sex scandal in the obama family. >> george bush, it was the financial crisis. >> right. >> and katrina. >> and iraq. >> the idea's how they handle it. >> i'm going to go out on a limb. i think the worst may be behind him. he's actually got more momentum going in than most presidents do. his numbers are actually going up. the economy's getting a little bit better. the wars are winding down so he does have a shot but most important thing to say is i think he's found his game. >> if you look at president's popularity, his is low. >> one of the lowest in past 20, 30 years but the numbers moving in the right direction. i think he's found his rhythm, found a way to act
line. >> we remember the one line in the kennedy speech. we don't remember jack from johnson, nixon, reagan. you go up the line. >> we don't have that kin of attention span, okay? >> but i think it speaks to the fact that let's be honest. inauguration speeches are really not memorable. >> but we remember what the first lady wore. >> we'll talk about that more coming up. >>> still ahead, we've been talking about the inauguration, but, of course, at the heart of the inauguration is the next four years. up next, we'll talk with congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz, chair of the democratic national committee. that's straight ahead. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. [ female
. >> and let's not forget, lyndon johnson and the vietnam war. one of the things we know absolutely for sure, is that something is going to go wrong in the second term. it always does. always. sometimes you can foresee it as it's coming, could be a natural disaster, a terrorist attack, it could be -- who knows what, i think that we're pretty safe in deciding that there's not going to be a sex scandal in the obama family. >> george bush it was the financial crisis. >> exactly. >> but i -- >> katrina. >> and iraq. >> the idea is how they handle it, how they handle it. >> i'm going to go out on a limb. i think the worst may be behind him. he's actually got more momentum going in than most presidents do, his numbers are actually going up. the k34e's getting a little bit better, the wars are winding down, he does have a shot. i think the most important thing i would say is, i think he's found his game. >> you look at his popularity as compared to other presidents, it's relatively low. >> it is. one of the lowest in the past 20, 30 years, the numbers are moving in the right direction. i think he's
was reading a poem, but i was just a kid, but i came to gw in 1964. so i saw the johnson inaugural. it was facing the west front. it was much more intimate and cramped sort of in the back -- excuse me, the east front and then i remember jimmie walker -- jimmy carter walking. >> that was what the secret service called him. >> yes. that created quite a stir in january of '77. in '80 reagan went to the west front because he wanted to look west and that was something and then in 1996 just a personal remembrance i was at georgia brown's eating lunch and i walked out and bill clinton, the great procrastinator, was riding by in his limousine and i saw through the window he was still writing revisions of his second inaugural address, but it's always an extraordinary event and, of course, nobody could forget obama, just the surge, just the enormous, enormous crowds that were unbelievable. so that's kind of a smorgasboard of my ancient memories. e appreciate re a walking the color that you can provide. >> thank you. >> fox 5 political analyst mark plotkin, thanks as always. >>> sports is com
term. iran contra, it often does not work out. >> and let's not forget, lyndon johnson and the vietnam war. one of the things we know absolutely for sure, is that something is going to go wrong in the second term. it always does. always. sometimes you can foresee it as it's coming, could be a natural disaster, a terrorist attack, it could be -- who knows what, i think that we're pretty safe in deciding that there's not going to be a sex scandal in the obama family. >> george bush it was the financial crisis. >> exactly. >> but i -- >> katrina. >> and iraq. >> the idea is how they handle it, how they handle it. >> i'm going to go out on a limb. i think the worst may be behind him. he's actually got more momentum going in than most presidents do, his numbers are actually going up. the k34e's getting a little bit better, the wars are winding down, he does have a shot. i think the most important thing i would say is, i think he's found his game. >> you look at his popularity as compared to other presidents, it's relatively low. >> it is. one of the lowest in the past 20, 30 years, the numb
lyndon johnson interpreted his mandate in 1964 as a blank check in vietnam. that is one of the great dangers that confronts presidents. i do not think there is a second term curse. i think there are a number of factors. i think the word mandate should be removed from the white house dictionary. in a polarized area, presidents have a tendency to over- interpret. host: let me add this iconic photograph of president bill clinton, hugging monica lewinsky. only the second president to face impeachment. guest: we have been told by people who should know that president clinton was willing to use some of the political capital he had. he won a significant, decisive victory over bob dole in 1996. he was prepared to move on entitlements, the so-called third rail of american politics, which would have required him spending a lot of political capital. then when the whole scandal broke, that was no longer a viable option. host: let me share with you this story from "the washington post." there is one sentence from this article i want you to react to. mcdonough is seen as an obama true believer who
, lyndon b. johnson in 1963. james in brandon, florida on our republican line. good morning. caller: good morning. thank you for taking my call. i wanted to ask the country to pray for our president obama -- i am a republican, and i voted republican this year. that was to my commitment to the republican party. i am very disappointed with my party. i do not like the direction they are taking. to be honest with you, i do not like the fact that they are not cooperating in the house or any other place with democrats or with president obama. i would ask the president if he would open upper a new investigation on the 9/11 attacks on this country. i am unsatisfied with the commission report that was put out. host: that was james in brandon, florida. you can see on the capital, five large flags hanging down. the explanation of the five different flags they had hanging down -- this is a congressional report. framed against the black -- the backdrop -- the backdrop of red, white and blue -- we have at ross flag with starch -- stars are arranged in the circle. the next two flags are the flags the u.
that money we turned around and spent eight because johnson created the unified budget so we no longer have that fire will. and so all of a sudden now the 02.6 trillion to social security that we are going to have to borrow as social security on linus which is about 2030, the regular social security problem. >> host: matthew posts senator coburn, three questions. one, the social security and other social entrance programs like medicare and medicaid infringe on personal responsibility? number two, cbo reports federal health spending will dominate mandatory spending by the mid 20s 30's. >> host: there's been a lot of psychological and social research on this. if you think somebody else will take care of you, and it's your government saying you will, then you are less likely to plan or prepare for that. and cbo is right my generation will hit 65 in march and there's 3.5 million of us this next year that become eligible for medicare and the next year 3.5 million become eligible for social security. because that was in the tip o'neill and ronald reagan six. that's why the demographics are so imp
the inauguration on television. lyndon johnson made history, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bullet proof inaugural. ronald reagan's second inaugural, so cold, only snow filled the stands. bill clinton ushering in more than just a second term. the first to be carried on that thing called the internet. >> i, william jefferson clinton. >> reporter: and president obama with the first lady by his side again after already making history four years ago in front of nearly 2 million spectators. david muir, abc news, washington. >> he'll be the first democrat in more than 75 years to get a majority of the popular vote twice. only five other presidents have done that in all u.s. history. i love the trivia behind inauguration. it's interesting to go back in the file that day. fascinating day for the obamas and for the country. so keep it here on abc news throughout this very big day. we'll be back. ev...direction for my life..... ...through my accomplishments... ...and now, with help... ...and support from my family and others, i own... i own my recovery... ...from addiction and de
of the same budget so you will find people up for reelection getting slaughtered in los angeles, tim johnson up for reelection going to lose that one, going to have a tough reelection. 22 democrats on the ballot in 2014 don't want to pass a budg budget. so they can sit back and say we will give you three months debt extension, but we will underscore the fact the president and harry reid will not lead in the country is going bankrupt. i hope they actually pass a budget but i doubt they will be able to do that now. ashley: all of these things sucking money away every day need to be reformed, don't you agree? tracy: i find it interesting talking bout medicaid, states have to balance their budgets. you're just pushing the buck saying we don't want to take care of this, some of them governors and they'll have to deal with it. they will not be happy if they have to block medicaid and choose whether to balance the budget or pay off medicaid. speaker that is simply not true. >> yes, it is. >> democratic states are broke. michigan is a balanced budget, to look at where the republicans are governing,
instead of wanting to be magic johnson, he wants -- >> now the moan is beginning mark. charles schumer of new york, the chairman of the joint committee on inaugural ceremony. >> mr. president, mr. vice president. members of congress, all who are present, and to all who are watching,we lcome to the capital and to his celebration of our great democracy. [applause] [cheering] >> this is the 57th inauguration of an american president. and no matter how many times one witnesses this event, it's simplicity, its innate majesty, and most of all, it's meaning, that sacred yet cautious entrusting of power from we the people to our chosen leader, never fails to make one's heart beat faster as it will today with the inauguration of president barack h. obama! [cheering] >> now, we know that we would not be here today where it not for those who stand guard around the world to preserve our freedom. to those in our armed forces, we offer our infinite thanks. for your bravery, your honor, your sacrifice. >> this democracy of ours was forged by intellect and argument, by activism and blood. and, above a
tell you, brian, this is -- it's unreal to me. it is unbelievable. as lyndon johnson would say it's like history and fate coming together. for this president, this african-american, to be inaugura inaugurated for a second time on martin luther king day and can look out and see the likeness of martin luther king. to see jefferson, to see lincoln. it is just unreal. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation, almost 50 years after the march on washington, dr. king delivered the i have a dream speech, it says something about the distance we have come, the progress we have made and for him to make a speech that was so inclusive, it was about black people, white people, asian americans, latino, native americans, straight, gay, that we're one people. we're one family. we are one house. we all live in the american house. >> well, about that last point, congressman, we want to let you go and enjoy your lunch, we all do live in the same house and there you are. you have gone from the struggle earlier in your life to a warrior in the house of representatives. you have got an anxious amer
on the shoulders of people who have been in the white house. president lincoln, kennedy, johnson. the asa stands on the shoulders of the black people who experienced it in the white house. as you noted in your intro, this goes from thosroindividuals who worked to build the white house when washington, d.c., when the country first came into existence, washington dc did not exist. it literally had to be built and it took 10 years. much of that labour from clearing the land, moving the trees and rocks came from african americans and slave labor. the iconic buildings that we know, the capital, the white house, both were built not only by unskilled black labor, people who did just sort of the hard work, but still black labor like carpenters, or african- americans. the first african-american who had engaged in the president's residence whether it was the white house we know now in washington or in the residence of the president george washington when he first went to new york and then when he moved from new york to the president's residence in philadelphia, and both of those residences, washington too
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